Monthly Archives: October 2017

Dell Powerconnect 2700 Vs. 2800 Series Switches

Both the Dell PowerConnect 2700 series and 2800 series switches are secure, fixed-port Gigabit switches. The Dell PowerConnect 2700 series was launched in the early 2000s, designed to deliver full wire-speed switching performance. Not long after the 2700 series, the 2800 series were released to support jumbo frames for networks that need to move large files across the network. They are both cost-effective solutions for small network environments, such as branch offices, schools and etc. However, it seems that it is hard to make a decision about purchasing these two series switches. This article would offer a satisfied solution to you and give a brief introduction to 2700 series and 2800 series switches.

Dell PowerConnect 2700 Series Switches

The Dell PowerConnect 2700 series switches are web-managed switches, the web-interface allows the user to easily manage the network switch without learning CLI commands or integrating the switch into an SNMP-based application. These switches offer three port densities, including 8, 16, 24 and 48 Gigabit Ethernet 1 ports. Besides, the 2724 and 2748 have SFP slots in a combo port arrangement that deliver fiber capabilities. Auto MDI/MDIX and autonegotiation of speed, duplex mode and flow help deliver improved control over your network traffic. Totally, there are four models of 2700 series switch—Dell PowerConnect 2708, 2716, 2724, 2748. The main features of these switches are listed in the below:

  • There switches are prepared in advance for any elevated IT requirements.
  • They could eliminate the potential risks within the switch.
  • The 2700 series switches provide the flexibility to meet the requirement of various end users and applications environments.
  • They provide smartly balancing quality and the best prices.

dell-powerconnect-2716-overview

Figure1: Dell Powerconnect 2716 switch

Dell PowerConnect 2800 Series Switches

As same as the 2700 Series Switch, Dell PowerConnect 2800 Series Switches are also web-managed Gigabit Ethernet switches. These switches offer four port densities, including 8, 16 , 24, and 48 port Gigabit Ethernet ports. In addition, the 2824 and 2848 have SFP slots in a combo port arrangement that deliver fiber capabilities (SFP transceivers optional). The PowerConnect 2800 family also supports jumbo frames for networks that need to move large files across the network. There are also four switch models of 2800 series switches—Dell PowerConnect 2808, 2816, 2824, and 2848. Main benefits of 2800 series switches are listed in the following.

  • Easy web access to the managed features provides a secure environment by offering password restricted access.
  • These switches offer enhanced security by allowing the user to specify which IP addresses have access to the switch.
  • The 2800 series switches support up to six link aggregation groups consisting of up to four ports per group.
  • Advanced cable diagnostics help improve network troubleshooting.

Dell 2800 series switch

Figure2: Dell 2800 Series Switches

Dell 2700 Vs. 2800 Series switches

As being described, the Dell PowerConnect 2700 and 2800 series switches are nearly identical. But they still have some subtle differences in STP, management configuration, switching and price.

—Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)

Compared to Dell PowerConnect 2700 series switches, 2800 series support more STP protocols and support 9000 jumbo frames (not not 9014, etc.). If you do a ping -f on the 2724 with jumbo frames enabled it will go to 5000, 5500, 6000, but not 9000 – they get fragmented at that point. Granted that is only useful for iSCSI traffic, and even then it’s not 100% necessary. And the 9014+ jumbo frames is of the preference.

—Management Configuration

Both 2700 and 2800 series switches are small office switches with minimal management. They all not have LACP. BootP/DHCP IP address management or Static IP address assignment are set within the 2800 series switches. The 2800 series switches have CLI and SNMP Command Subset while the 2700 series switches do not.

—Switching

The link aggregation of both two series switches are up to eight aggregated links and up to eight member ports per aggregated link (IEEE 802.3ad). But the Jumbo frame of 2700 series switches support up to 9000 Bytes (2716, 2724, and 2748). The 2800 series switches have LACP support (IEEE 802.3ad).

—Price

Compared to 2700 series switches, 2800 series switches are cheaper. Just take the same 16-port switch for a example, a new Dell 2816 switch only needs $56 while a new Dell 2716 switch costs $112 on eBay.

Conclusion

Through this article, we are clear about the Dell 2700 and 2800 series Gigabit Ethernet switches as well as their differences in STP, management configuration, switching and price. They all powerful switches with outstanding cost and power savings. You can select an appropriate one according to your need.

Originally published at http://www.fiber-optic-cable-sale.com/dell-powerconnect-2700-vs-2800-series-switches.html.

TP-Link T1700G-28TQ—An Economic Choice for SMBs

As new emerging networking standards, 40G and 100G network have been achieved initial success. But they are based on the 10G network. With the growing numbers of small business enterprises, 10G SMB switches are also in a large demand. TP-Link has introduced the T1700 Series 10G Smart Switches: the T1700X-16TS Full 10 Gigabit Smart Switch and the T1700G-28TQ Gigabit Stackable Smart Switch with 10G Uplink. They provide high levels of performance and the increased scalability that meet the requirements of SMBs. This article would introduce the T1700G-28TQ and its compatible optics.

TP-Link T1700G-28TQ Switch

As one of the TP-LINK’s Gigabit stackable smart network switches, the T1700G-28TQ is able to provide reliable, cost-effective and resilient networking solutions for SMBs. The switch is equipped with 24 10/100/1000Mbps RJ-45 ports and 4 dedicated 10G SFP+ slots which can be used for uplinks and/or stacking, providing a strong interconnection between access and aggregation.

TP-Link T1700G-28TQ Switch

Figure1:TP-Link T1700G-28TQ Switch

Features & Benefits
—Physical Stacking

The T1700G-28TQ supports rich L2 features, including 802.1Q tag VLAN, Port Isolation, Port Mirroring, STP/RSTP/MSTP, Link Aggregation Groups, and 802.3x Flow Control function. Besides, T1700G-28TQ supports L2+ feature static routing, which provides simple network segmentation by routing internal transmissions to make the ow of network traffic more efficient.

—Abundant L2 and L2+ Features

The stack system of T1700G-28TQs supports up to 40Gbps bi-directional stacking bandwidth with built-in redundancy and auto-failover. The switch supports up to 6 units in a stack, which allows it to provide up to 144 GE ports, 12 available 10G SFP+ uplinks and 768Gbps switching capacity, offering high-density developments as well as flexibility for future network expansion need.

—Secure Networking

The T1700G-28TQ supports IP-MAC-Port Binding, Port Security, Storm control, and DHCP Snooping, which help to protect the network from broadcast storms, ARP attacks, and more. And the switch supports 802.1X, which allows network clients to be authenticated through external Radius servers and the guest VLAN function allows non-802.1X clients to access specific network resources.

—Enterprise Level Management

The T1700G-28TQ is easy to use and manage. It supports various user-friendly standard management features, such as intuitive web-based Graphical User Interface (GUI), industry-standard Command Line Interface (CLI), SNMP (v1/2/3), and RMON. This allows the switch to provide valuable status information and send reports on abnormal events. Comprehensive IPv6 support management ensures a smooth migration to an IPv6-based network. It also supports Dual Image to provide improved reliability and network uptime.

Compatible Optics for TP-Link T1700G-28TQ

As being mentioned, the TP-Link T1700G-28TQ has 24 10/100/1000Mbps RJ-45 ports and 4 dedicated 10G SFP+ slots to achieve network connectivity. And it is a switch supports different optical modules and network cables. For the 10/100/1000Mbps RJ-45 ports, you can use 100BASE-TX or 1000Base-T optical transceiver with UTP category 5, 5e or above cable (maximum 100m) to achieve the link. Besides, you can also use 1000BASE-X with singlemode or multimode fiber optic cable to connect.

10G optics

Figure2: Optional choices for 10G network

As for the 10G SFP+ ports, there are two approaches to achieve transfer the data. You can choose 10G optical transceivers or 10G Direct Attach Copper (DAC) cables to transfer data. The TP-Link T1700G-28TQ support 10BASE-T with UTP category 3, 4, 5 cable (maximum 100m), 10GBASE-LR and 10GBASE-SR to connect. In addition, you can use TP-LINK TXC432-CU1M or TP-LINK TXC432-CU3M to achieve the link.

The main compatible optical modules and cables are listed in the below:

  • 10BASE-T: UTP category 3, 4, 5 cable (maximum 100m)
  • 100BASE-TX/1000Base-T: UTP category 5, 5e or above cable (maximum 100m)
  • 1000BASE-X: MMF, SMF
  • 10GBASE-LR
  • 10GBASE-SR
  • TP-LINK TXC432-CU1M
  • TP-LINK TXC432-CU3M
Conclusion

TP-Link T1700G-28TQ provides cost-effective solution for 10G SMB networking. This article mainly discussed about its definition, features and benefits as well as compatible optical modules and cables. If you are looking for its compatible optical modules and cables, why not take FS into consideration? We offer generic 10G SFP+ modules and TP-LINK compatible 10G DAC cables (TXC432-CU1M/TP-LINK TXC432-CU3M ) for the T1700G-28TQ. For 10G data transferring, we recommend 10G DAC cables. Compared to the expensive optical modules, they are much cheaper. They only cost $11 and $15 respectively at FS.COM. For more details, please visit www.fs.com.

Originally published at http://www.fiber-optical-networking.com/tp-link-t1700g-28tq-economic-choice-smbs.html.

SDN Switch Vs. Non-SDN Switch

As one approach of the network agility and mobility lifting/increasing, Software Defined Networking (SDN) uses canned processes to provision the network. It is an emerging technology designed to address mobility and agility. An OpenFlow switch is a software program or hardware device that forwards packets in a SDN environment. With the popularity of SDN network, a lot of people puzzle about if it is necessary to use SDN network switch for SDN network. This article would give a brief introduction to SDN network and SDN switches, and provide a satisfied answer about the necessity of SDN switch for SDN network.

About Software Defined Networking

In a software defined networking system, canned processes are used to provision the network. For instance, users should be able to program the network when they want to build a tap, instead of building a network tap using an appliance. SDN makes the network programmable by separating the control plane (telling the network what goes where) from the data plane (sending packets to specific destinations). It relies on switches that can be programmed through an SDN controller using an industry standard control protocol, such as OpenFlow.

SDN-Framework

Information About SDN Switch

A OpenFlow/SDN switch, when it receives a packet, that it does not have a flow for (Match + exit port) will contact a SDN controller(Server) and ask what must it do with this packet. The controller can then download a flow to the switch, possibly including some packet manipulation. Once the flow is downloaded to the switch it will switch similar packets at wire-speed

SDN Concept

Having a central server that knows the network layout and can make all the switching decisions and build the paths gives us new capabilities. The advantages of the SDN switches are listed in the below:

1.The SDN controller could route non critical/bulk traffic on longer routes that are not fully utilized.

2.The SDN controller could send the initial couple of packets to a firewall, and once the firewall is happy/accepts the flow, the SDN controller can bypass the firewall thus removing load from the FW and allowing multi-gigabit datacenters to be fire-walled.

3.The SDN controller can easily implement load-balancing also at high data rates by just directing different flows to different hosts, only doing the set-up of the initial flow’s.

4.Traffic can be isolated without the need for vlan’s, the SDN controller can just refuse certain connections.

5.Setup a network TAP/Sniffer easily for any port or even specific traffic by programming the network to send a duplicate stream to a network monitoring device.

6.It allows for the development of new services and ideas all in software on the SDN controller. OpenFlow-Actions.

SDN Switch Vs. Non-SDN switch

—Working Environment

SDN switches are specially produced for SDN networking. A normal switch works independently of the rest of the network.

—Data path

In a traditional optical switch device, packet forwarding and high-level routing are on the same device. An OpenFlow switch separates the data path from the control path. Separate controller makes high-level routing decisions. The switch and controller communicate by the OpenFlow protocol.

SDNConcept

—Convenience

In the old switches you would have to go to the locations of the switch login to the command line and then configure it through the command line. With open flow enabled switches you could program the switch by sending commands through openflow messages. SDN controller helps you to program the switches. In other words, SDN controller uses openflow and gives you an interface to program the switched.

Do We Need Special SDN Switches for SDN Networking?

Special SDN data switches are not required to implement software-defined networks. SDN architectures will take many different approaches as they mature and change, and each technology vendor will have a unique take on how to implement SDN. For example, VMware, with its acquisition of Nicira, will implement SDN protocols in its Switch software, which does not require specialized hardware or a controller. Many suppliers are offering specific SDN controllers, such as OpenFlow controllers offered by Big Switch, NEC, HP and IBM, and controllers that are not OpenFlow-specific and use other protocols (offered by Cisco and Juniper).